Q Why Doesnt Life And Evolution Violate The Second Law Of Thermodynamics Dont Living Things Reverse Entropy

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Q: Why doesn’t life and evolution violate the second law of thermodynamics? Don’t living things reverse entropy? Posted on March 24, 2013 by The Physicist. Physicist: In very short: nope. The second law of thermodynamics is sometimes (too succinctly) stated as “disorder increases over time”. That statement seems to hold true, what with mountains …

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The process of evolution on this planet does not violate the second (entropy) law of thermodynamics. The reason that almost 100% of the world’s physicists and other scientists (ie. the people who actually understand evolution and the laws of thermodynamics) accept the concept of evolution is because it very logically and elegantly explains the amazing biological …

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TLDR: Evolution does not violate the Second Law of Thermodyamics, because Earth is not a closed system. The entropy of the entire solar system increases over time, but Earth is a small part of that

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Why life does not violate the second law of thermodynamics? T he second law of thermodynamics states that the entropy of a closed system will always increase with time. The only known closed system is the entire universe. Living organisms are not a closed system, and therefore the energy input and output of an organism is not relevant to the second law of

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Doesn't Evolution Violate the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics? The second law states that "In a closed system (one in which energy cannot enter), Entropy will not decrease." Since Entropy often refers to disorder, this law is often taken to mean that order cannot arise from disorder. How then would life, which is highly ordered, form naturally?

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They argue that since the operation of evolution is towards higher and higher levels of organization and complexity, evolution violates the second law and thus fundamentally cannot occur. For example, a prominent creationist site declares [ SecondLaw2011 ]: However, this basic law of science (2nd Law of Thermodynamics) reveals the exact opposite.

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The second law of thermodynamics (the law of increase of entropy) is sometimes used as an argument against evolution. Evolution, the argument goes, is a decrease of entropy, because it involves things getting more organized over time, while the second law says that things get more disordered over time. So evolution violates the second law.

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However, it is based on a flawed understanding of the second law of thermodynamics, and in fact, the theory of evolution does not contradict any known laws of physics. The second law of thermodynamics simply says that the entropy of a closed system will tend to increase with time.

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The second law of thermodynamics states that the entropy (S), a measure of disorder, increases during any spontaneous process in an isolated system. We can view the entire universe as an isolated system, leading to the conclusion that the entropy of the universe is tending to a maximum. However, all living things maintain a highly ordered, low entropy

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Locally it seems to, but overall, no. Life, which is a very organized system, would seem to violate the second law of thermodynamics. In fact, when you look at it locally, it certainly seems obvious. However, the problem is that the second law applies to closed systems. This means we need to expand our view of what we use to measure the total Entropy.

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Life does not violate the second law of thermodynamics, but until recently, physicists were unable to use thermodynamics to explain why it should arise in the first place. In Schrödinger’s day, they could solve the equations of thermodynamics only for closed systems in equilibrium. In the 1960s, the Belgian physicist Ilya Prigogine made progress on predicting the …

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The argument linking life and evolution to decreasing entropy centers around thinking of low entropy as more "organized" -- that a low entropy system has fewer states that it can occupy compared to all the states in the universe. In this sense life is anti-entropic, but remember it is also a local phenomenon.

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A common argument against evolution is that the theory contradicts the Second Law of Thermodynamics that claims disorder, or entropy, always increases or stays the same over time. This law has plenty of everyday examples. Buildings break down over time, and food spoils if not eaten soon enough.

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No. No known phenomena violates the second law of thermodynamics. Explanation: The second law of thermodynamics postulates that the entropy of a closed system will always increase with time (and never be a negative value). The only known closed system that exists is the entire universe and thus the law applies to the universe as a whole.

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No, evolution does not violate the Second Law of Thermodynamics.No life disobeys the Second Law. Zygotes become embryos, embryos become foetuses, foetuses become babies, then children, then adults.

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Furthermore, biological evolution would be the development of life over time, which involves increasing order, which also appears to violate the second law of thermodynamics. Evolutionists have offered various theories of how the naturalistic origin and development of life does not violate the second law of thermodynamics.

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Why life does not violate the second law of thermodynamics? Human organisms are not a closed system and thus the energy input and output of an the organism is not relevant to the second law of thermodynamics directly. No The Second Law of thermodynamics applies in the truest sense to closed systems. Living systems can not be closed systems or they are …

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Frequently Asked Questions

Does life on earth violate the second law of thermodynamics?

Since T1is much larger than T2, it is clear that the net entropy of the two reservoirs increases: Even if it is true that the processes of life on earth result in an entropy decrease of the earth, the second law of thermodynamics will not be violated unless that decrease is larger than the entropy increase of the two heat reservoirs.

Why dont living things reverse entropy?

Don’t living things reverse entropy? Physicist: In very short: nope. The second law of thermodynamics is sometimes (too succinctly) stated as “disorder increases over time”. That statement seems to hold true, what with mountains wearing down, machines breaking, and the inevitable, crushing march of time.

Do living organisms defy the 2nd law of thermodynamics?

Do living organisms defy the second law of thermodynamics? No. No known phenomena violates the second law of thermodynamics. The second law of thermodynamics postulates that the entropy of a closed system will always increase with time (and never be a negative value).

Is evolution a decrease of entropy?

Evolution, the argument goes, is a decrease of entropy, because it involves things getting more organized over time, while the second law says that things get more disordered over time. So evolution violates the second law.

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