How Does Ohms Law Apply To Your Everyday Life

Facebook Share Twitter Share LinkedIn Share Pinterest Share Reddit Share E-Mail Share

Estimated Reading Time: 3 mins

Preview

Posted in: Ohms law formula wheelShow details

Estimated Reading Time: 2 mins
1. Conventional Domestic Fans. We can control the speed of the fans at our homes by moving the regulator to and fro. Here the current flowing through the fan is controlled by regulating the resistance through the regulator.
2. Electric Heaters. The electric heaters are the common appliances used in winters throughout the world. The heaters have a metal coil which has high resistance that permits a certain amount of current to flow through them to provide the required heat.
3. Electric Kettles and Irons. The electric kettle and irons have a lot of resistors in them. The resistors limit the amount of current to flow through them to provide the required amount of heat.
4. Design of Electric Devices. The electronic devices such as laptop and mobile phones require a DC power supply with the specific current. Many devices need a certain amount of current and voltage to operate.
5. Fuse Design. Fuses are the protection components that limit the amount of current flowing through the circuit and to establish a certain amount of voltage.
6. Mobile or Laptop Charger. Mobile and Laptop chargers use DC power supply in the operation. DC power supply provides a variable output voltage based on the resistance and the overall working is controlled by Ohm’s law.

Preview

Posted in: Ohm s law for dummiesShow details

6 Examples Of Ohm’s Law In Everyday Life Ohm’s Law is the relationship between the current, voltage and resistance and which is derived by the German Physicist, George Simon Ohm . Ohm law’s application ranges from household appliances like heaters to the high tension wires and massive projects like rockets and spaceships.

Estimated Reading Time: 3 mins

Preview

Posted in: Ohm's law chart formulaShow details

Ohm’s law is applied when selecting the appropriate circuit breakers or fuses to be used in the protection of a number of electrical devices, within the household. When the resistance of a lamp is known, then an individual can calculate the overall resistance of a circuit and establish the right circuit breaker or fuse to be used.

Preview

Posted in: Ohm law formulasShow details

Ohms law is used in electrical engineering to calculate the relationships between current, voltage and resistance. The calculations are required to design a safe circuit

Preview

Posted in: Applications of ohm s lawShow details

Ohm’s Law Ohm’s law explains the relationship between voltage and the current flowing through resistors. Ohm’s law: The current flowing through any resistor is directly proportional to the voltage applied to its ends. Mathematically Ohm’s Law is given by V = IR Where V = Voltage, I = Current, R = Resistance

Preview

Posted in: Understanding ohm's law for dummiesShow details

Solution to Example 5 Ohm's law V = R I is similar to equation of lines of the form y = m x and we know that m is the slope of the line y = m x. Hence in the graph of V against I given above, the slope of the graph is the resistance. We need two points from the graph to find the slope.

Preview

Posted in: How to do ohm's lawShow details

Georg Ohm discovered this law in 1827 while he was experimenting on how metals an be used to conduct electricity. Â He found out that the equation E = I x R can be used in AC and DC circuits. AC means alternating current which flows one way and continually changing between positive or negative.

Preview

Posted in: Learning ohm's law for dummiesShow details

Ohm's Law does not have a problem here any more than any other formula in the sciences which involves dividing by a denominator which can go to zero. Ohm's Law exhibits a singularity when there is no resistance, but a nonzero voltage.

Preview

Posted in: Form LawShow details

©2019 L A Waygood. Ohm’s Law is one of the most fundamental ‘laws’ in electrical engineering, and most students and electricians believe that it is ‘universal’ —i.e. it applies to all conductors, circuits, and electronic components, under all circumstances.. In fact, this is NOT the case! Ohm’s Law is not ‘universal’, and there are more conductors, circuits, …

Preview

Posted in: Law CommonsShow details

Ohm’s Law is identified as V = I x R, where V is the voltage, I is the current and R is the resistance (in Ohms). The formula may be shown as I = V / R and R = V / I depending on what value you need to get. Voltage over resistance will present you with the electrical current value, thus, I = V / R. Current and voltage are directly

Preview

Posted in: Form LawShow details

R= RESISTANCE (ohms) So, if you need to find voltage, current, or resistance, simply place your finger over what you’re trying to find and the formula wheel will do the rest. The Ohm’s law formula wheel is represented mathematically in three simple equations. I (current) x R (resistance) = E (voltage)

Preview

Posted in: Form LawShow details

Examples, where Ohm’s law is not applicable, are given below: The diode is an example that helps in understanding the limitations of Ohm’s law. When the voltage versus current graph is plotted for a diode it is observed that the relation between voltage and current is not linear. This happens when the voltage is marked in the reverse

Preview

Posted in: Law CommonsShow details

According to Ohm's law, the value of the current flowing through a conductor is directly proportional to the value of the potential difference applied across two terminals. The equation of Ohm's law is I= V/R, here the constant of proportionality is R that is the resistance, V is the voltage and I is the current flowing through the wire.

Preview

Posted in: Form LawShow details

Ohms law describes how Voltage, Current and Resistance relate algebraically, stating. Voltage (E) = Current (I) multiplied by Resistance (R) E=IR. or you can rewrite it many ways. I=E/R R=E/I. So lets do an example, We have a circuit consisting of a 12v Battery and a resistor measuring 2 …

Preview

Posted in: Law CommonsShow details

Background information on Ohm’s law: Ohms law can be used to identify the relationship between voltage, current, and resistance in any DC electrical circuit discovered by a German physicist named, Georg Ohm. This law states that voltage is equal to the product of the total current and the total resistance.

Preview

Posted in: Form LawShow details

Ohm’s law is a way of describing the relationship between the voltage, resistance and current using math: V = RI. V is the symbol for voltage. I is the symbol for current. R is the symbol for resistance. I use it VERY often. It is THE formula in electronics. You can switch it around and get R = V/I or I = V/R.

Preview

Posted in: Form LawShow details

Please leave your comments here:

Related Topics

New Popular Law

Frequently Asked Questions

What is ohms law?

Ohms law describes how Voltage, Current and Resistance relate algebraically, stating Voltage (E) = Current (I) multiplied by Resistance (R) or you can rewrite it many ways So lets do an example, We have a circuit consisting of a 12v Battery and a resistor measuring 2 Ohms.

How do you use ohms law in kirchhoff current laws?

Ohm’s law is basic for Kirchhoff Current Laws and Kirchhoff Voltage Laws. You can calculate any one unknown electric quantities (from electric current, potential difference, and resistance) if the other two are given. I have created online calculators to calculate these values. You can use them directly. 1. Electric Current

What is the difference between ohms law and watts law?

While Ohm’s law defines the relationship between resistance, voltage, and current in a circuit; Watt’s law defines the relationship between power, voltage and current. However, you can combine these laws to get useful formulas.

How do you apply ohms law on a circuit?

Ohm’s law can be applied on a part or whole circuit at once. If applied on a whole electric circuit, the total voltage is divided by the total resistance of the circuit to know the value of total flowing current in the circuit.

Most Popular Search