Do You Need A Law Degree To Work In Hr

Facebook Share Twitter Share LinkedIn Share Pinterest Share Reddit Share E-Mail Share

No, you do not, unless you would like to become an employment lawyer. Will training and certifications in the field of law help you be a better human resources specialist? It absolutely will! If you are interested in this lucrative field, please see our selections for the Best Online Schools for Bachelor of Human Resources Degree Programs that we have compiled for your …

Preview

Posted in: Employment LawShow details

Yes of course you can work in HR or Industrial Relations with a law degree. You can supplement your law degree with studies in Labour Law or Employment legislation if you plan to work in a country with complex employment legislation. 2.5K views View upvotes Related Answer Kaustubh Pujari , studied at MBA in Human Resource Management

Preview

Posted in: Employment LawShow details

Do I can work in HR field with law degree? - Quora

Estimated Reading Time: 8 mins
1. Workplace Discrimination Laws. Among the most important legislation for HR professionals to know, Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) laws protect against the discrimination of any individual based on age, disability, genetic information, national origin, race/color, sex, pregnancy, or religion.
2. Wage and Hour Laws. These laws, protecting the wages and hours of employees, are regulated by the U.S. Department of Labor. The main statute—the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)—has a number of important functions.
3. Employee Benefits Laws. This category of laws helps protect employees’ access to benefits. The most prominent laws include: The Affordable Care Act, also known as “Obamacare,” which was enacted to increase access to affordable healthcare for those living below poverty levels.
4. Immigration Laws. Immigration laws, including the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), serve to ensure that employers only hire candidates eligible to work in the U.S., including citizens, noncitizen nationals, lawful permanent residents, and aliens authorized to work.
5. Workplace Safety Laws. The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) was created in 1970 to ensure employees are afforded safe working conditions. Compliance of this regulation is overseen by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, a division of the U.S. Department of Labor.

Preview

Posted in: Form Law, Employment LawShow details

You don’t need to be a practicing lawyer to work within the U.S. patent or trademark office. A bachelor’s is the minimum educational requirement. This profession also calls for discipline, focus, and above all, reasoning. A patent examiner reviews legal documents, files paperwork, writes legal office actions and researches invention information.

Estimated Reading Time: 9 mins

Preview

Posted in: Form Law, Document LawShow details

1. Earn your bachelor's degree. You will need to earn your bachelor's degree before being able to earn a law degree. Choose a college or university that offers a Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies or a comparable program, make sure it's accredited and earn competitive grades in your courses. Consider completing internships and speaking with an …

Preview

Posted in: University Law, Colleges LawShow details

You don’t need to have been to university or have bags of cash to work in the legal industry. Here are some alternative options• How I became the UK’s youngest barrister in 600 years• Law

Preview

Posted in: University Law, Industry LawShow details

Our Juris Master degree with a specialization in Employment and Human Resources Law provides students a keen understanding of the underpinnings of employment laws on each level of government. Human relations practitioners will benefit from coverage of the ever-expanding laws and policies impacting the organizations they serve. Check out the Employment Law

Preview

Posted in: Employment Law, Government LawShow details

Casey Berman, founder of Leave Law Behind, discusses the truth behind the phrase “You can do anything with a law degree” and …

Preview

Posted in: Law CommonsShow details

Law Degree Requirements. A person who wishes to practice law in any state in the U.S. must obtain a law degree by completing three years of legal study. In addition to obtaining a law degree, a person must pass a bar exam and a legal ethics exam to become a practicing lawyer. The courses law schools require you take

Preview

Posted in: Study LawShow details

Related: 12 Sexy Things You Can Do with a Law Degree Barnes said that people with a law background who are looking for a new career can go into anything from politics to the arts. Just one look at

Preview

Posted in: Law CommonsShow details

1. High School Teacher. Law school teaches you a lot about how our government functions, which makes it excellent experience for a career in teaching. Of course, you can also teach at a law school, but you may also want to consider sharing your expertise at the high-school level.
2. Curriculum Specialist. If you have an interest in education but aren’t too keen on working in a classroom, there are options for you to work behind the scenes creating lesson plans and curricula in the subject of law.
3. Legislative Analyst. This is probably the most obvious choice for a law school graduate looking to branch out a bit—especially if your desire for obtaining a law degree stemmed from an interest in public policy.
4. Nonprofit Executive Director. Running a nonprofit organization requires a fair amount of knowledge about the law. As a director, you would need to know about federal laws pertaining to nonprofit status and tax exemptions, as well as labor and employment law.
5. Therapist. If you pursue this path, you’ll likely need to obtain more education—perhaps a certification, perhaps a PhD. However, the skills you’ve already learned in law school will likely help you as a therapist.
6. Foreign Service Officer. Interested in international relations? Consider pursuing a career as a Foreign Service Officer with the U.S. State Department. You’ll do things such as research and write reports, and enter into negotiations with government officials.

Preview

Posted in: Employment Law, International LawShow details

However, this is far from the case. If you’ve changed your mind about law, you may be wondering what you can do with a law degree under your belt. There are a diverse range of jobs out there and a law degree equips you well for a significant number of them. Here’s a look at ten jobs that you can do with a law degree.

Preview

Posted in: Law CommonsShow details

1. Legal Consultant. A legal consultant is someone who provides expert and professional legal advice on a contractual basis to businesses and/or individuals.
2. Law Professor. The University of Texas Austin Law School describes this job as “hyper-competitive.” The best way to describe the competitiveness of getting this job is to compare it to getting a job at a large law firm.
3. Mediator. Arbitration and mediation are forms of Alternative Dispute Resolution that allow parties to avoid court costs while seeking a mutually acceptable outcome to a conflict without having to stand before a judge.
4. Legislative Analyst. Government officials and agencies, nonprofit and service agencies and private companies employ legislative analysts to monitor and analyze the activities and new policies established by local, state and federal governments.
5. Broadcast Journalism. There are many TV personalities in the broadcast news media who graduated from law school. Cynthia McFadden, currently the senior legal and investigative correspondent for NBC news, graduated from Columbia Law School.
6. Novelist. This may be one the most difficult professions to be successful. There are millions of aspiring novelists in America, but some of managed to buck the odds and become best-selling authors.
7. Entrepreneur. Perhaps during your travails as a practicing attorney, you come up with an idea for a new product or service that could be successful. This may start as a hobby (again-best not to quit your day job), as it did with Nina and Tim Zagat.
8. Legal Operations Manager. The responsibilities of legal operations managers vary widely from department to department, and business to business. Along with managing outside counsel and vendors, some operation specialists oversee department budgeting and staffing, as well as diversity and pro bono programs.
9. Insurance Senior Legal Counsel. For those with law practice experience, there are opportunities within all major Property and Casualty (P&C) insurance companies for legal counsel positions.
10. Politician. The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) wrote an article in February , 2012, stating that since 1945 one-third to one-half of U.S. Senate seats were occupied by lawyers.

Preview

Posted in: Insurance Law, Form LawShow details

1. The Civil Service. One of the most obvious destinations for Law graduates is the Civil Service. In the UK, there’s even the highly competitive Civil Service fast track scheme available to parachute you to the top.
2. Politics. If the behind-the-scenes bit of government doesn’t sound great to you, perhaps the front-of-house roles appeal more. Lots of Law graduates go into politics, whether that’s as elected officials or in the array of roles supporting politicians, such as election agents.
3. Activism. If the Civil Service is the most strait-laced side of civil society, than becoming an activist is probably at the opposite end of the scale.
4. Lobbying. The final item on this list connected to government, lobbying is like activism but with much better dinners and a sizeable paycheck to make up for the fact that you probably won’t feel passionate about anything that you’re lobbying for.
5. Recruitment. The world of recruitment is a more popular destination for Law graduates than you might think, whether that’s in working for a recruitment agency generally, or doing something more specialised like headhunting.
6. HR and labour relations. You can put those hours spent studying employment law to good use if you decide to work in human resources (HR) or the related field of labour relations, which is about managing the relationship a company has with trade unions.
7. Entrepreneurship. Sometimes it may feel that the study of Law is primarily the study of things that businesses got wrong, from dubious interpretations of EU ruling on competition to snails winding up in bottles of ginger beer.
8. Law enforcement. If Law school has only made you feel more passionate about seeing the law upheld, perhaps a move into law enforcement could be a good next step.
9. Legacy administration. Almost anywhere that carries out fundraising for donations also receives gifts in the Wills of supporters who’ve passed away. This is the case for a diverse range of causes, whether it’s a traditional charity, a university, a museum, a political party or just about anything else that people might feel strongly enough to support financially even after they’ve passed away.
10. Journalist. Being a Law student requires a lot of research, reading material that can sometimes be quite dry, and condensing it into a more easily understood and hopefully more engaging form.

Preview

Posted in: Support Law, Form LawShow details

Increase Your HR Law Expertise with an Online Law Degree. The Master of Arts in LawHuman Resources Law, offered completely online (with select on-campus course options), will enhance your HR skills through comprehensive coursework. This includes contracts, employment law, strategic human resource management, and negotiations, giving you a better …

Preview

Posted in: Contract Law, Employment LawShow details

You would need to pass the CILEx Level 3 Diploma and the CILEx Level 6 Diploma before undertaking 3 years’ qualifying employment. You can then take the Legal Practice Course (LPC) and the PSC as you would if you were a law graduate. Apprenticeship: You can do an apprenticeship where studying for a degree isn’t necessary. You will need to

Preview

Posted in: Employment Law, Study LawShow details

The type of degree you have for a job in HR can vary. There are HR employees with degrees in Political Science, Business, Social Work, Elementary Education, IT, and other non-HR degree areas. Many employees have a Master's Degree in HR, with Bachelor's degrees that were in different subjects. HR is a much more popular degree, and much more

Preview

Posted in: Business Law, Education LawShow details

Please leave your comments here:

Related Topics

New Popular Law

Frequently Asked Questions

Do you need a law degree to work in hr?

The answer is yes. Indeed, the employer would be smiling secretly at the added legal knowledge and expertise now in his HR department. As you rise through the HR department, you’ll need certain HR certifications or qualifications, but those won’t be anything more strenuous that your law degree.

Is a law school degree worth it?

But as competition for attorney jobs becomes more intense, many law school graduates are turning to alternative careers that do not require a law license but leverage the valuable education of a law degree. Law school can also pair well with your undergraduate major for great job opportunities.

Is a law degree a good career option?

There are several career options for those who want to work in the legal field. With hard work, a law degree is possible and can lead to a sustainable career. In this article, we'll discuss different law degrees, how to obtain them and what they can do for your career. What are the different types of law degrees?

What can you do with an online human resources law degree?

This includes contracts, employment law, strategic human resource management, and negotiations, giving you a better understanding of the laws that affect your career. Taught from a biblical perspective, this online human resources law degree helps to solidify your reputation as a trusted professional.

Most Popular Search