Are There Employment And Labour Laws In Canada

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Federal labour standards Canada.ca

8 hours ago Federal labour standards. Part III of the Canada Labour Code talks about federal labour standards. These set out the employment conditions for hours of work, payment of wages, leaves, vacation, holidays, and more. These standards apply to employees working in federally regulated businesses.

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Rights in the workplace Canada.ca

3 hours ago Both the labour rights and responsibilities of employers and employees within federally regulated sectors fall under the Canada Labour Code. The rights of foreign workers in Canada are also protected under federal or provincial/territorial labour laws. On this page: The Canadian Human Rights Act. Duty to accommodate; The Employment Equity Act

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Are There Employment And Labour Laws In Canada

7 hours ago Employment Law vs Labour Law: A Brief Explainer KCY at … 3 hours ago While the terms labour law and employment law are often used interchangeably, they are two distinct areas of Canadian law.To be fair, both labour and employment law are concerned with similar issues regarding the safe and equitable running of the workplace. However, there are some key differences between the two.

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Labour and Employment Law in Canada 2019 Guide

7 hours ago

Estimated Reading Time: 10 mins
Published: Jun 17, 2019
1. Legal Framework. Employment law in Canada is governed both by statute and, in nine of the ten provinces, by common law. The province of Québec differs in this respect in that it has no system of common law.
2. Employment Standards. Each Canadian province or territory sets the minimum employment standards applicable to all employees within their jurisdiction. These minimum statutory employment standards include
3. Human Rights. All jurisdictions in Canada (federal, provincial and territorial) have passed human rights legislation prohibiting discrimination in the employment relationship based on grounds that usually include race, sex, age, religion, colour, disability, marital or family status, ancestry or place of origin and sexual orientation.
4. Equal Pay. Most Canadian provinces, including Ontario, Alberta, Québec, British Columbia and Saskatchewan, have adopted legislation requiring public sector employers and, in some cases, private sector employers to provide equal pay for work of equal value.
5. Occupational Health and Safety. All jurisdictions have legislation and other measures designed to reduce the incidence of occupational accidents and diseases in the workplace.
6. Workers’ Compensation / Workplace Safety Insurance. Workers’ compensation is not dealt with in Canada through private insurance. Rather, workers’ compensation is dealt with by way of statute and systems administered by government bodies or agencies.
7. Employment Insurance. Employment Insurance (EI) is a federal initiative established and governed by the Employment Insurance Act. The statute is designed to help workers adjust to economic change, while maintaining the incentive to work.
8. Collective Bargaining. Canada’s system of collective bargaining is embodied in federal and provincial labour relations acts and labour codes. Canadian workers have the right to join trade unions, which may be certified to collectively bargain conditions of employment with their employers on their behalf.
9. Considerations for the Acquisition of a Canadian Business. Share Acquisition. When the shares of a company are purchased, the legal personality of the corporation does not change.

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Employment & Labour Law 2021 Canada ICLG

1 hours ago

1. Terms and Conditions of Employment. 1.1 What are the main sources of employment law? Employment law in Canada is governed by employment contracts, statutes, and in nine of the 10 provinces, by common law.
2. Employee Representation and Industrial Relations. 2.1 What are the rules relating to trade union recognition? Under labour legislation, there are procedures pursuant to which a trade union can take steps to become recognised or certified as a bargaining unit on behalf of a group of employees.
3. Discrimination. 3.1 Are employees protected against discrimination? If so, on what grounds is discrimination prohibited? Employees are protected against discrimination under human rights legislation, which varies by jurisdiction.
4. Maternity and Family Leave Rights. 4.1 How long does maternity leave last? Pregnant employees are generally entitled to 16 to 18 weeks of unpaid leave.
5. Business Sales. 5.1 On a business sale (either a share sale or asset transfer) do employees automatically transfer to the buyer? An asset purchase or other transaction which results in the change of legal identity of the employer will result in a certain number of considerations.
6. Termination of Employment. 6.1 Do employees have to be given notice of termination of their employment? How is the notice period determined? Employment standards legislation provide minimum notice periods for the termination of an employee.
7. Protecting Business Interests Following Termination. 7.1 What types of restrictive covenants are recognised? Non-competition and non-solicitation clauses are the main types of restrictive covenants recognised in Canada.
8. Data Protection and Employee Privacy. 8.1 How do employee data protection rights affect the employment relationship? Can an employer transfer employee data freely to other countries?
9. Court Practice and Procedure. 9.1 Which courts or tribunals have jurisdiction to hear employment-related complaints and what is their composition? In most Canadian jurisdictions, employment-related complaints of various natures can be heard by civil courts.
10. Response to COVID-19. 10.1 Are there any temporary special measures in place to support employees and businesses during the COVID-19 emergency? In response to the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, most jurisdictions in Canada have amended employment standards legislation and regulations to support both employers and non-unionised employees, such as extending the time periods for temporary layoffs and with respect to leaves of absence.

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Canada Labour Code Justice Laws Website

8 hours ago Federal laws of canada. Marginal note: Crown corporations 5 (1) This Part applies in respect of any corporation established to perform any function or duty on behalf of the Government of Canada and in respect of the employees of any such corporation, except any such corporation, and the employees thereof, that the Governor in Council excludes from the operation of this Part.

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Employment law overview canada 20192020

1 hours ago apply to employment and labour law in all Canadian jurisdictions, including Québec. 1. introduction In Canada, the power to make laws is divided between the federal and provincial governments. Generally, for historic, constitutional reasons, provinces have jurisdiction over most employment matters, while the

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Canada: Employment & Labour Law

9 hours ago Canada: Employment & Labour Law This country-specific Q&A provides an overview to employment and labour law in Canada. It will cover termination of employment, procedures, protection for workers, compensation as well as insight and opinion on the most common difficulties employers face and any upcoming legal changes planned..

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5 Things You Need to Know About Canadian Employment …

9 hours ago

1. Are You Covered Under Federal Canadian Labour Laws or Provincial? Not all employment law in Canada is equal. While about 90% of Canadians are covered by provincial labour laws, there are some industries that are under the scope and jurisdiction of the federal government.
2. Dismissal, Quitting or Being Laid Off. Canadian employment law protects employees through the Canada Labour Code from being laid off or dismissed without proper notice or compensation.
3. Federal Occupational Health and Safety Standards. The federal government has also set standards to keep you safe on the job. The Occupational Health and Safety standards set out in the Canada labour code are there to ensure every employer meets minimum standards to keep each employee safe while performing their duties.
4. Job Reassignment or Necessary Leave. Any employee is pregnant, nursing or has a medical certificate outlining a need for modified duties can request them from their employer for up to 24 weeks after the birth of their child or until medical clearance is given may be reassigned to a position that meets their needs.
5. How Does Provincial Employment Law Differ. Provincial employment laws cover about 85% of employees within Alberta. Most of the standards outlined in the Provincial labour law are very close or the same as federal employment laws.

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Employment Law vs Labour Law: A Brief Explainer KCY at …

3 hours ago While the terms labour law and employment law are often used interchangeably, they are two distinct areas of Canadian law. To be fair, both labour and employment law are concerned with similar issues regarding the safe and equitable running of the workplace. However, there are some key differences between the two. Below is a brief overview of the two fields of law, labour law and employment

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Employment Law in Canada Is EmployeeFriendly

6 hours ago Employment Law. Employment Law in Canada Is Employee-Friendly. By Allen Smith. By By Allen Smith October 22, 2015. BOSTON—When it comes to employee rights, Canada is a sunny place to be. Mothers

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Labour Law The Canadian Encyclopedia

Just Now Labour Law. Labour law governs COLLECTIVE BARGAINING and industrial relations among employers, their unionized employees and trade unions. In Canada a distinction is commonly made between labour law narrowly defined in this way and EMPLOYMENT LAW, the law of individual employment relationships, comprising the common law of master and servant and supervening …

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Canada Employment Law: Knowing Your Employee Rights

8 hours ago Fairness at Work: Federal Labour Standards for the 21st Century. In terms of employee rights, we've come an awful long way from 1872. That was the first-ever year of our annual Labour Day parade. Back then – if you can imagine this – it was still a crime to be a member of a union in Canada, under the law of criminal conspiracy.

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What are labor laws like in Canada? Remote

1 hours ago Canada’s provinces enforce different amounts of paid leave, different tax rates, different minimum wages, and other contributions from employees and employers. Rather than cover every small difference, let’s take a high-level look at Canada’s labor laws to set expectations for what it’s …

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Employment & Labour Law LexisNexis Canada Store

4 hours ago ISBN/ISSN 9780433501237. In Stock. $330.00. View details. Halsbury's Laws of CanadaEmployment (2019 Reissue) Release date August 28, 2019. This title covers employment law topics such as human rights legislation, employment standards, obligations and duties of the employee, and more. Publisher LexisNexis Canada.

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Five Key Differences Between Canadian and U.S. Employment Law

4 hours ago

1. Canadian Employment Law Is Largely a Provincial Matter, not a Federal Government Matter. In Canada, approximately 90% of the workforce is regulated by provincial governments.
2. No At-Will Employment. In the United States, an employer may be able to terminate its employee "at-will." In Canada, unless there is a legal justification for the employee’s termination (or the employee has a written employment agreement specifying a termination package), the employer is obligated to provide reasonable notice or pay in lieu of notice.
3. Overtime-Exempt Positions. In Canada, the exemption of employees from overtime is governed by the applicable jurisdiction’s employment standards legislation.
4. Employees With Disabilities. Like in the United States, an employer is prohibited from engaging in discriminatory practices, unless it meets a stringent bona fide occupational requirement (BFOR).
5. Constructive Dismissal. In Canada, the employer constructively dismisses an employee if it changes a fundamental term of the employment relationship without the employee’s consent.

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Labour and employment law in Quebec BLG

6 hours ago Labour & Employment Law in Quebec: A Practical Guide 5 income which an employee may derive or should have derived from alternative employment cannot be used to reduce the employer’s mandatory minimum obligation under the Labour Standards Act, but may be used to reduce the employer’s obligation to provide reasonable notice or pay in lieu of notice under the Civil Code or to reduce the

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Top 10 Developments in Canadian Employment and Labour Law

6 hours ago

1. ARBITRATION CLAUSES IN EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS. Kicking off our list is the Ontario Court of Appeal’s (Court of Appeal) first decision of 2019: Heller v. Uber Technologies Inc., 2019 ONCA 1.
2. NO TORT OF HARASSMENT IN ONTARIO. In Merrifield v. Canada (Attorney General), 2019 ONCA 205, the Court of Appeal confirmed that there is no tort of harassment in Ontario.
3. COURTS CONTINUE TO GRAPPLE WITH TERMINATION CLAUSES. The issue of the enforceability of termination clauses in employment contracts has been a perennial “hot topic,” and 2019 was no different.
4. MOST PROVINCES INCREASE THE MINIMUM WAGE. Minimum wages increased across many provinces in Canada in 2019. Minimum wages now range from a low of C$11.32 per hour in Saskatchewan to a high of C$15 per hour in Alberta.
5. AMENDMENTS TO THE CANADA LABOUR CODE. For federally regulated employers, Parliament made numerous amendments to the Canada Labour Code this past year.
6. IMPORTANT DEVELOPMENTS IN ALBERTA. In Hall v. Stewart, 2019 ABCA 98, the Alberta Court of Appeal confirmed that a director may be exposed to personal liability for workplace incidents despite the employer having coverage under the Workers’ Compensation Act (Alberta).
7. LEGISLATIVE CHANGES IN QUEBEC. We highlight below several important legislative developments in Quebec in 2019. Amendments to the Act respecting labour standards (ARLS)
8. PRO RATA BONUS DAMAGES. In Andros v. Colliers Macaulay Nicolls Inc., 2019 ONCA 679, the Court of Appeal concluded that the employee, Andros, was entitled to damages for a portion of his bonus despite that he had not completed the full bonus year.
9. COURT RECOGNIZES DISTINCTION BETWEEN SHAREHOLDER RIGHTS AND COMMON LAW WRONGFUL DISMISSAL RIGHTS. Also of note in 2019 case law is the Court of Appeal’s decision in Mikelsteins v. Morrison Hershfield Limited, 2019 ONCA 515.
10. BARRING CLAIMS FOR CONSTRUCTIVE DISMISSAL ARISING FROM MENTAL DISTRESS. Rounding out our list is a decision from Ontario’s Workplace Safety and Insurance Appeals Tribunal (Tribunal) in Morningstar v. Hospitality, 2019 ONWSIAT 2324.

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Is The Canadian Labour And Employment Law Journal Refereed

9 hours ago Canadian Labour & Employment Law Journal Lancaster House. 1 hours ago Canadian Labour & Employment Law Journal.New Release – Volume 23 No. 1. The Canadian Labour & Employment Law Journal (CLELJ) is Canada's foremost periodical in the field, providing in-depth analysis of key issues as well as timely commentary on major legislative and case law developments.

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Labour and Employment Law in British Columbia

6 hours ago Labour & Employment Law in British Columbia: A Practical Guide 1 Introduction In British Columbia as in other Canadian provinces, laws dealing with employment matters come within the jurisdiction of the local legislature (called the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia), except where

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Key Differences in US and Canada Employment Laws

1 hours ago

1. Minimum wages. In Canada, each province sets its own hourly minimum wage, and this is usually revised annually. Minimum wage currently varies between $9.75 and $10.30 (Canadian dollars).
2. Hours of work and overtime. The concept of “hours of work” exists to determine when overtime becomes due. Overtime is 1.5 times the regular rate of pay.
3. Rest and meal periods. These standards usually provide for weekly required rest periods and daily required meal periods. Most commonly, a weekly rest period will be equivalent to a 24-hour period that an employee must be off.
4. Mandatory holidays. These are paid days off for employees. The required number varies from province to province, but on average employees will be entitled to 8 or 9 statutory holidays every year.
5. Vacation periods and pay. The amount of paid annual vacation to which an employee is entitled to depends on his or her years of service for the company.
6. Leaves (pregnancy or maternity, parental, emergency, and family medical). Pregnancy or maternity leaves in Canada are usually approximately 17 weeks. They can begin before the mother gives birth.
7. Termination notice and severance pay. Each province provides for a minimum termination notice period. It varies between 1 and 8 weeks, depending on the employee’s years of service.
8. Unjust dismissal hearings with possible reinstatement remedy. In some provinces, an employer cannot terminate an employee with 1 to 2 or more years of service without good and sufficient cause, even with reasonable termination notice.

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Canadian labour law Wikipedia

9 hours ago Regulatory framework. The federal, provincial, and territorial governments all regulate labour and employment law in Canada, with the federal government regulating a few particular economic sectors and the provinces and territories regulating all others. The constitution gives exclusive federal jurisdiction over employment as a component of its regulatory authority for specific industries

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Canada Labor Code Changes Have Taken Effect

8 hours ago New amendments to the Canada Labor Code affect approximately 18,000 federally regulated employers and 900,000 of their workers.

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Labour Laws vs Employment Law — Wong Employment Law

3 hours ago Labour laws in Ontario usually refer to those laws that apply to unionized employment. Employees in a union have greater bargaining power because they collectively bargain with the employer regarding the terms and conditions of employment. Between every union and employer, there is one contract of employment that governs over all employees in

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Canada Labour Standards Regulations Justice Laws Website

9 hours ago Federal laws of canada. Table of Contents. Canada Labour Standards Regulations. 2 - Interpretation 3 - Exclusion of Professions 4 - Modified Work Schedule 6 - Averaging 8 - Weekly Rest 10 - Employees Under 17 Years of Age 11 - Apprenticeship 11.1 - Reporting Pay 12 - Annual Vacations 15 - General Holidays 17 - Regular Rate of Wages for Purposes of General Holidays, Personal Leave, Leave for

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Updates to Canadian Federal and Provincial Labor Laws

2 hours ago Canada has recently made a number of changes to labor laws both provincially and federally. This article is a guide to key changes both currently in place and happening in the near future. It will discuss: Federally Regulated Workplaces Subject to Labor Code Changes ; Bill 66: Ontario Changes to the Employment Standards Act

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10 US Labor Laws that Protect Employee and Workers’ Rights

2 hours ago

1. Norris-LaGuardia Act (1932) The Norris-LaGuardia act was passed at a time when workers had essentially no rights to organize. Courts routinely issued injunctions against striking and picketing by workers.
2. National Labor Relations Act (1935) Passed in 1935, this labor law, more than any other, dictates the terms of labor relations in the private sector.
3. Fair Labor Standards Act (1938) The result of a long fought struggle on the part of workers, the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 standardized the eight-hour day and prohibits child labor.
4. Taft-Hartley Act (1947) The Taft-Hartley Act is a series of amendments to the NLRA. Passed in a more conservative post-war climate, the amendments were intended to forbid unfair labor practices by unions.
5. Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act (1959) Also known as the Landrum-Griffin Act, this labor law was passed in response to corruption and racketeering in labor unions.
6. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act (1964) According to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, no employer may “refuse to hire or to discharge any individual, or otherwise to discriminate against any individual with respect to his [or her] compensation, terms, condition, or privileges of employment, because of such individual’s race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.”
7. Age Discrimination in Employment Act (1967) The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) prohibits employment discrimination against people 40 years of age or older.
8. Occupational Safety and Health Act (1970) The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act) covers private sector businesses who have two or more employees.
9. Family and Medical Leave Act (1993) The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) lets eligible employees take unpaid leave for specific family and medical reasons without the danger of losing their jobs or health insurance.
10. Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act (2013) In 2013, the Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Compliance Programs issued Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act as well as the Vietnam Era Veteran’s Readjustment Assistance Act.

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What Manufacturers Need to Know About Labor and Employment

3 hours ago Manufacturers in Canada face a labor and employment environment that is much more employee and union-friendly than the United States. That said, a sophisticated manufacturing employer that is educated, strategic, and proactive about managing its plant can find itself with a competitive business advantage. Here are just a few of the “Need to Knows” for manufacturers that are presently …

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Canada Important changes to the Federal Labour Code from

3 hours ago From 1 September 2019, new provisions in the Canada Labour Code will change employees’ entitlement to continuity of employment, breaks and …

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INDIVIDUAL LABOUR LAW AND IT’S BASIC FEATURES The

5 hours ago Labor laws can be broadly divided into two categories. They are Individual Labor Law and Collective Labor Law. Collective Labor Law deals with the employer and registered trade union. The basic features of labour law in almost every country between one another are mediated through the contract of employment between the two. This has been the

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Labor Laws and Issues USAGov

800-746-1553

Just Now Mining: Contact the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) at 1-800-746-1553 or file online to report mine safety or health hazards. Interstate Trucking: If you have a problem, such as being forced to drive in unsafe conditions, fill out the online complaint form. Or you can call 1-888-DOT-SAFT ( 1-888-368-7238 ).

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Employment Standards Ministry of Labour, Training and

Just Now Changes to Employment Standards Act, 2000 rules Ontario COVID-19 Worker Income Protection Benefit. On April 29, 2021, the Ontario COVID-19 Worker Income Benefit came into effect and the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (ESA) was amended. Employers are now required to provide eligible employees with up to three days of paid infectious disease emergency leave because of …

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Employment Law Labour Rights Law Office Serving BC

3 hours ago Employees have rights in every province and territory in Canada. Many employee rights come from the laws made by our provincial and federal governments. Examples of rights that come from these laws include the right to a minimum wage and overtime, the right not to be discriminated against for things like colour, or sex, or disability, and the right to work in a safe workplace.

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How American Employment Law Differs from Canadian

6 hours ago The Employment Standards Act, 2000 and similar legislation in Canada’s other provinces and territories allow for overtime pay at 1.5 times an employee’s usual pay, wherein their weekly hours exceed 44 hours, and wherein their employment capacity does not meet the definition of “supervisory” or “managerial”, among other exceptions

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Labour law Wikipedia

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Labor and Employment Law: A Career Guide

1 hours ago Given the distinguishable set of issues encompassed in each field, labor law and employment law remain discrete areas of practice. However, these two fields have, over time, become increasingly symbiotic. Careers in either field can involve both labor and employment law questions.

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Federal or provincial? Understanding employment and labour

5 hours ago Canadian courts have recognized that labour relations are presumptively a provincial matter, and that the federal government has jurisdiction over labour relations only by way of exception.This exception has always been narrowly interpreted. [emphasis added] NIL/TU,O Child and Family Services Society v. B.C. Government and Service Employees’ Union (“NIL/TU,O”), 2010 SCC …

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Employment & Labour Law 2021 USA ICLG

8 hours ago

1. Terms and Conditions of Employment. 1.1 What are the main sources of employment law? There are federal, state and local employment laws. The primary federal employment laws are: Title VII (of the Civil Rights Act); the Americans with Disabilities Act; the Age Discrimination in Employment Act; the Equal Pay Act; the Fair Labor Standards Act; the Family and Medical Leave Act; the Immigration Reform and Control Act; the National Labor Relations Act; the Occupational Safety and Health Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA); the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; and Executive Order 11246 for government contractors.
2. Employee Representation and Industrial Relations. 2.1 What are the rules relating to trade union recognition? The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) governs union recognition and provides for union recognition when a majority of employees vote for a union in a secret ballot election or when an employer recognises a union based on a majority of employees having signed authorisation cards.
3. Discrimination. 3.1 Are employees protected against discrimination? If so, on what grounds is discrimination prohibited? Employees are protected against discrimination on the basis set forth in question 1.2 above.
4. Maternity and Family Leave Rights. 4.1 How long does maternity leave last? Under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), eligible employees are provided up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave per year.
5. Business Sales. 5.1 On a business sale (either a share sale or asset transfer) do employees automatically transfer to the buyer? Employees do not automatically transfer to a buyer, but this is the case in a share sale because the employing entity remains the same.
6. Termination of Employment. 6.1 Do employees have to be given notice of termination of their employment? How is the notice period determined? At-will employees do not have to be given notice of termination nor do unionised employees unless a collective bargaining agreement otherwise provides.
7. Protecting Business Interests Following Termination. 7.1 What types of restrictive covenants are recognised? The enforceability of restrictive covenants is determined by state law and varies depending on the jurisdiction.
8. Data Protection and Employee Privacy. 8.1 How do employee data protection rights affect the employment relationship? Can an employer transfer employee data freely to other countries?
9. Court Practice and Procedure. 9.1 Which courts or tribunals have jurisdiction to hear employment-related complaints and what is their composition? Federal courts have jurisdiction to adjudicate employment-related cases arising out of federal employment law and employment cases where the parties are citizens of different states or a non-United States citizen.
10. Response to COVID-19. 10.1 Are there any temporary special measures in place to support employees and businesses during the COVID-19 emergency? The Family First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) and the CARES Act expanded FMLA leave and unemployment coverage for employees and provided loan options for employers.

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Welcome to 2018 with new employment and labour law rules

3 hours ago

1. 1. Legalization of recreational marijuana The federal government intends to legalize recreational marijuana (Bill C-45, Cannabis Act), effective July 2018. Most provinces and territories are in the process of implementing legislation to regulate the sale, possession and use of marijuana in their specific region. Federal Bill C-45 passed third reading in the House of Commons and received first reading in the Senate as of November 28, 2017, and is undergoing public consultation. In regards to what the provinces and territories are doing to meet this future requirement, here is a brief overview: 1. In Alberta, on December 15, 2017, Bill 26, An Act to Control and Regulate Cannabis, received royal assent and, when proclaimed in force, will make cannabis consumption legal for persons 18 years of age and older. Under the bill, private retailers may sell cannabis to the public, but online sales will only be by the provincial government. 2. In December 2017, the British Columbia government a...

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Difference Between Employees and Independent Contractors

1 hours ago Whether you are an an employee or contractor determines your entitlement to employment insurance benefits and how you are treated under the law. If you are an employee, you: are protected under the common law and employment legislation (the Code ), which covers things like minimum wage, holidays, overtime, termination, and notice

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Welcome to 2020: A Federal and Ontario Employment and

2 hours ago Welcome to 2020: A Federal and Ontario Employment and Labour Law Summary. We are almost at the end of the second month of 2020 and have compiled for you a number of upcoming employment and labour law changes and key compliance issues that federally regulated and Ontario employers need to consider in their HR and payroll practices.

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Key Differences between Ontario & Quebec Employment Law

1 hours ago Sean Bawden is a partner with the law firm of Kelly Santini LLP. He was called to the bar in 2008 and practices in the areas of employment law and civil litigation. He has also taught Trial Advocacy for Paralegals and Small Claims Court Practice at Algonquin College. He is the author of the employment law blog Labour Pains www

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Comprehensive List of U.S. Employment and Labor Laws

5 hours ago

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Labour Law in Canada: Carter, Donald D., England, Geoffrey

8 hours ago Although it may be said that there are eleven distinct systems of labour law in Canada - encompassing ten provinces and the Federal government - the authors ensure depth of treatment by focusing on common policy themes and typical legal solutions, with significant departures noted in whatever province or area of law they may arise.

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Labour Laws in India : Everything you need to know

8 hours ago Indian labour law applies to employment regulatory laws. There are more than 50 national laws and many more laws at the state level. Traditionally Indian governments at the federal and state level have tried to provide employees with a high degree of protection by implementing labour laws.

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Canada vs United States Labor Stats Compared

6 hours ago Labor Stats: compare key data on Canada & United States. Labor Stats. : compare key data on. Canada. &. United States. Agricultural workers > Male : Proportion of employed males engaged in the agricultural sector. Employment by economic activity (%) …

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Labour law: Latest News & Videos, Photos about labour law

3 hours ago The labour ministry has envisaged implementing the four labour codes from April 1 this year in one go. The ministry is in the final leg of amalgamating 4 central labour laws into four broad codes on wages, industrial relations, social security and OSH. more

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Frequently Asked Questions

What kind of laws are in place for employment in canada?

In Canada, the employment relationship is governed by employment-related legislation, the common law (or, in Québec, the Civil Code ), and employment contracts. Labour and employment matters are principally within provincial and territorial jurisdiction; however, the federal government has jurisdiction...

What are the federal labour standards in canada?

Part III of the Canada Labour Code talks about federal labour standards. These set out the employment conditions for hours of work, payment of wages, leaves, vacation, holidays, and more. These standards apply to employees working in federally regulated businesses. New workplace standards for interns and student interns.

Where does labour law take place in canada?

In Québec, the Civil Code of Québec governs instead of the common law. Under Canada’s Constitution Act, labour and employment law is mostly subject to provincial jurisdiction, with some select industries under federal jurisdiction, including but not limited to, banking, air transportation, railway, port services, and telecommunications.

What are the rights of an employee in canada?

These are the minimum standards established by law that define and guarantee rights in the workplace. Most workers in Canada - about 90 percent - are protected by the employment laws of their province or territory. Each province and territory has its own legislation.

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