Are There Any English Law Statues In Singapore

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1 hours ago Act 3 of 2017. Administration of Justice (Protection) Act 2016. Act 19 of 2016. Actions. Download PDF (140.1 KB) Subsidiary Legislation. Add to My Collections.

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2 hours ago The position prior to November 1993. Singapore’s legal system has its roots in the country’s colonial past. Besides the British legal system, Singapore law also drew from the Indian Penal Code and Evidence Act, the Australian-influenced Companies Act and over time, developed its own distinct local character in laws relating to land, drug trafficking, corruption and vandalism.

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4 hours ago Singapore Statutes Online The Legislation Division provides free public access to Singapore legislation at Singapore Statutes Online (SSO). Please visit the SSO website at https://sso.agc.gov.sg .

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3 hours ago

Estimated Reading Time: 8 mins
1. The Importance Of Discipline. Singaporeans place a lot of importance on discipline, and corporal punishment is widely accepted. Caning is not only used to punish criminals but also as a disciplinary measure in schools, the military, and in the domestic scene.
2. Chewing Gum. Chewing gum is banned in Singapore so leave it at home when packing your bags. Importation of chewing gums into the country, even if it is not for trading, is illegal.
3. Littering. Singapore is bent on maintaining its reputation of being impeccably clean, with an active campaign against littering and stringent enforcement in place.
4. Smoking. Smoking is prohibited in certain areas in Singapore. The smoking prohibition currently covers all indoor places where the public congregates. The ban was revised in 2009 to include indoor public places that are not air-conditioned, such as shopping centers, offices, and shops.
5. Homosexual Relations. The legislation on “Outrages on Decency” criminalizes same sex relations. This law used to be under the umbrella of “unnatural sex” or sex “against the order of nature.”
6. Jaywalking. Jaywalking is a term that was first coined in the U.S. and is now widely used in many countries. It refers to the reckless or illegal crossing of pedestrians on roads.
7. Urinating in Elevators & Not Flushing the Toilet. Not flushing the toilet is more than just a breach of propriety in Singapore, you will be breaking the law if you do so.
8. Vandalism. Vandalism is a serious offense in Singapore, with penalties that include not only fines, but also jail, and three to eight strokes of caning.
9. Drugs. It is important to note that the Singaporean authority does not distinguish between drugs taken back home before you entered the country, and those taken within their borders.

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4 hours ago Reception of English Law. 1.2.33 Prior to the enactment of the Application of the English Law Act (Cap 7A, 1994 Rev Ed), the Second Charter of Justice provided the legal basis for the general reception of the principles and rules of English common law and equity and pre-1826 English statutes (only those of general application) into Singapore.

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7 hours ago Singapore Journal of Legal Studies [2012] 357–365 THE RULE OF LAW IN SINGAPORE K. Shanmugam∗ I. Introduction Over the years, there have been many debates on what the Rule of Law actually means, and what it should include. Whether the Rule of Law should be “thick” or “thin”. The differences between “Rule of Law” and “Rule by

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7 hours ago There are two types of basis for taxation of legal costs, namely taxation on a standard basis and taxation on an indemnity basis. 'Standard basis' means that the party claiming costs has to show that any particular item was reasonably incurred or reasonable in quantum and therefore allowed.

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1 hours ago But don’t take my work for it, check out the links to Singapore Statues websites. Chewing Gum in Singapore will land you a $100,000 fine or 2 years in jail. Mandatory Flushing of Public Toilets – $150 fine. Smoking in a Public Place – $150 fine. Spitting or Expelling Mucus From the Nose in Public – $1,000 fine.

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6 hours ago Laws of Intestacy in Singapore. In the absence of a will, your estate will be distributed in accordance to Singapore’s Intestate Succession Act.. This does not apply if you are of Islamic faith. According to Section 7 of the Intestate Succession Act, the priority of distribution is as follows: (1) Spouse, children (2) Parents (3) Siblings (4) Grandparents (5) Aunts and Uncles.

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9 hours ago

1. No Chewing Gum. Contrary to popular belief, you can chew on a piece of gum while in Singapore, you just can’t sell it (don’t know how *ahem Johor Bahru ahem* that works)!
2. No PMDs/e-scooters. A very recent and rather abrupt ban just last week at the point of writing, e-scooters are now banned from both pedestrian sidewalks and roads.
3. No Long Hair?! (in the past) Such a ban once existed in Singapore during the 1960s. This was in response to the trending hippie culture at the time. The government deemed such an influence to be negative and detrimental to the country’s development and male individuals with long hair were punished from getting fined to having one’s hair being forcibly cut short.
4. Flushing at a Public Toilet?! Although we are completely unsure how individuals can be caught not flushing, those who are caught by the authorities can face hefty fines of up to $150.
5. Walking around your House Naked Law. Sorry, exhibitionists. Being naked in your own home is against Singapore’s Laws too. Yes, there is no such thing as getting too comfortable in your home.
6. Jaywalking Law- Believe it or not! You can get jailed for jaywalking. Up to 3 years. Yes, that’s how serious it is. The Yoolike team didn’t believe it at first either until a perfectly concealed TP officer came out of nowhere and issued us a fine!
7. Drinking Liquor in Public Places – 10:30 pm to 7:00 am. Following an intense riot back in Little India back in 2013, we no longer have the luxury of drinking our favourite beers and Jack Daniel’s in public anymore.

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6 hours ago

1. Singing. Penalty: <3 months in prison. According to Singapore Statutes Online, singing, reciting or uttering any ballad or obscene song in public is illegal.
2. Connecting to another person’s WIFI. Penalty: <3 years in prison or $10,000 fine. According to Singapore’s Computer Misuse and Cypersecurity Act, using another person’s WiFi is defined as hacking.
3. Feeding pigeons. Penalty: $500. Feeding pigeons might not sound like a criminal offense, but in Singapore it is. If you’re caught tossing your leftovers to the birds, it will cost you $500.
4. Homosexuality. Penalty: <2 years in prison. Same sex relations are forbidden in Singapore although this law is not nearly as strictly enforced as some of the other laws.
5. Flush! Or face the consequences! Penalty: $150. Failure to flush a public toilet after use may result in rather hefty fines according to laws in Singapore.
6. Smoking in public. Penalty: $152 – 760. In Singapore, there’s a law against smoking in public places and in vehicles. This law was put in place to ensure a clean and healthy environment for the public and protect people from secondhand smoke.
7. Walking around your house naked. Penalty: $1,000. While smoking at home is fine, walking around naked is not. If you break this law in Singapore, you may face pornography charges which can lead to imprisonment or big fines.
8. Littering. Penalty: From $300 – public service. First time offenders who throw small items like cigarette butts or candy wrappers are fined $300. If you are convicted of littering three times, you will have to clean the streets once a week with a bib on saying, “I am a litterer.”
9. Selling gum in Singapore. Penalty: $100,000 – 2 years in jail. Chewing gum is okay, but selling it is forbidden. According to Singapore Statutes Online, the punishment for smuggling gum into the country is up to 2 years in jail or a $100,000 fine.
10. Spitting in public. Penalty: <$1,000. Singapore is not a place for spitters. Reasonably, it’s illegal to spit in coffee shops and markets, but it’s also illegal on public roads, sideways and any other place that’s open to the public.

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3 hours ago New Legislation. DEC. 16. COVID-19 (Temporary Measures) (Rental Waiver Due to COVID-19 Event in 2021) (Amendment) Regulations 2021. Goods and Services Tax (Imports Relief) (Amendment No. 2) Order 2021. Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (Scale of Dues, Rates and General Fees) (Amendment No. 3) Notification 2021.

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7 hours ago Probably the most well-known of the laws is Singapore’s chewing gum law. Chewing gum in Singapore is completely forbidden. This also includes the sale of chewing gum, importing or bringing chewing gum into Singapore and spitting it out is the worst crime of all. 3. Smoking is forbidden almost everywhere in Singapore. Punishment: S$150 – S

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9 hours ago A. The Constitution limits the treaty laws that may be translated into Singapore law. 5.3.1 As we have seen, Parliament’s power to translate treaty laws into Singapore law is limited by the Constitution as the Singapore courts will, ultimately, determine the scope and extent of any repugnancy with the Constitution.

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1 hours ago

1. Judicial Precedent is another source of law. This is also known as “Judge made law”. The decisions of the court when deciding cases are called precedents and courts are generally bound to follow precedent of higher courts. Precedents are also called case law. An example to describe judicial precedent will be Fay v. Public Prosecutor case in 1994, concerned an American teenager, Michael Fay, who was arrested in 1994 for vandalizing cars and stealing street signs. He pleaded guilty to two charges of vandalizing by spraying paint on a number of cars. On conviction by a subordinate court, he was sentenced to a total of four months’ imprisonment and six strokes of the cane. For the purposes of sentencing, other charges were taken into consideration, including 16 charges of vandalism involving paint. Fay appealed to the High Court against the sentences, arguing that: Proviso to section 3 of the Vandalism Act required the prosecution to prove beyond reasonable doubt the indelible quality o...

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2 hours ago The chewing gum ban in Singapore was enacted in 1992 and revised in 2004 and 2010 [1]. It bans the import and sale of chewing gum in Singapore. Since 2004, only chewing gum of therapeutic value is allowed into Singapore following the United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (USS-FTA). Read More The sale of chewing gum is prohibited. Continue.

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1 hours ago The third money laundering offence is committed when a person who: (b) any property (in whole or in part, directly or indirectly) represents, another person’s benefits from drug dealing and criminal conduct; ( d) converts or transfers that property or removes it from Singapore. The relevant provisions are sections 46 (2) and 47 (2) of the CDSA.

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5 hours ago

1. Not Flushing the Toilet. Yes… Singapore literally has police walking around checking toilets. Is there anyone out there not in favor of this law? This should honestly be more than a fine!
2. Singapore Chewing Gum. Outside of nicotine or medical reasons it’s illegal to buy and sell chewing gum in Singapore. Ill admit we’ve never been big gum people, and there’s really nothing more annoying than someone chomping on it loudly in your ear.
3. Hugging Without Permission. If the Singapore chewing gum laws didn’t shock you then this next one might. Ever confused when bumping into someone you haven’t seen in awhile?
4. Spitting in Public. You’ll start to notice that some of these requirements are things that all people should abide by, and are not just Singapore laws tourists should know.
5. Feeding Birds. Maybe in your own country it’s okay to bring some bird feed to the many pigeons in the park. Yet, due to the weird Singapore laws you’ll have to let the birds fend for themselves here!
6. No Durians. Most public places ban eating, or the sale of durians in Singapore. Why do you ask? Well it’s literally the stinkiest fruit you’ll ever smell!
7. Eating on Public Transportation. While we’re on the topic of eating out… This is one of those weird Singapore laws that every tourist should know. How many times have you gotten on transit to work with a coffee, bagel, or some other type of snack on the go?
8. No Fishing. Fishing is another activity that’s not allowed in Singapore. You’ll see signs around the rivers and canals of the city, and if you’re caught it’s punishable by a hefty fine.
9. Urinating in Elevators. Apparently all elevators in Singapore are stocked with UDD’s (Urine Detection Device). This means if any urine is detected in the elevator, the doors lock automatically, and the perpetrator is stuck till the police arrive.
10. Smoking Restrictions. It’s obvious that smoking in public places is coming under scrutiny around the world, but Singapore has taken it to the next level.

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8 hours ago English laws in Singapore are subject modifications as circumstantially required. Only the English statutes listed in the Schedules to the Act in Singapore. No other English laws are part of Singapore law. How Laws in Singapore Are Formulated Stage 1: Introduction and First Reading

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2 hours ago

1. The Chief Justice, who is appointed by the President, is the head of the Judiciary. The Judiciary is made up of the Supreme Court and the Subordinate Courts. The Supreme Court hears both civil and criminal matters and is separated into the Court of Appeal and the High Court. The Subordinate Courts consist of District Courts, Magistrates’ Courts, Juvenile Courts, Coroners’ Court and Small Claims Tribunals. A Senior District Judge overlooks the Subordinate Courts. It is important that you know which Court to approach when you are suing someone or are being sued.

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Just Now Singapore Employment Law. All Singapore companies must comply with the employment laws of the country. Singapore’s Employment Act is fair and efficient; it extends several benefits to employees. All employment contracts of your company must conform to the employment laws or they will not be enforceable.

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7 hours ago H. If a packaged commodity is advertised in any manner with the retail price stated, there shall be closely and conspicuously associated with the retail price a declaration of quantity as is required by law or rule to appear on the package.

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4 hours ago Answer (1 of 5): Anywhere in the World, there's always the law and there's enforcement. Now remember this, the above two are as different as night and day. Most laws exist and are not always enforce. Doesn't matter if its because of corruption, negligence, stupidly or lack of resources or beca

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5 hours ago Here are the top 10 weird Singapore laws that still exist today 1. Male Homosexuality. Prior to 2003, homosexuals were barred from being employed in “ sensitive positions” within the government. Furthermore Lesbian, gay, bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) persons in Singapore may face legal challenges not experienced by non-LGBT residents.

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9 hours ago Gabriel Seah, lives in Singapore. Written Dec 1, 2015. According to Section 298 of the Penal Code, “Uttering words, etc., with deliberate intent to wound the religious or racial feelings of any person” is an offence punishable by up to 3 years in jail and/or a fine.

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8 hours ago Poland: Public Procurement Laws and Regulations 2021. ICLG - Public Procurement Laws and Regulations - Poland covers common issues including application of the law to entities and contracts, award procedures, exclusions and exemptions, remedies, privatisations and PPPs - in 19 jurisdictions.

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Just Now

1. Rents have been freely negotiated since the passage of Control of Rent (Abolition) Act 2001. Subsidized rents are provided to poor Singaporeans by the Housing and Development Board (HDB).

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9 hours ago According to the Singapore property laws, foreign citizens must satisfy certain conditions in order to qualify for property purchases. Among these are: - apartments in 6-level high condominium developments in HUDC (Housing and Urban Development Company) Phase I and II and privatized HUDC Phase III and IV. The Housing and Development Board has

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Just Now The Law Society of Singapore administers the Criminal Legal Aid Scheme (CLAS), which provides criminal legal assistance to individuals who are unable to afford a lawyer and are facing charges in a Singapore court for non-death penalty offences under selected statutes. 7.3 If so, are there any restrictions on the availability of public funding?

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2 hours ago A Government Bill is introduced by a Minister. Any private member may also introduce his own Bill. At least 2 clear days before a Government Bill is introduced in Parliament, a Notice of Introduction, signed by a Minister, must be given to the Clerk of Parliament together with a copy of the Bill. In the case of a Private Member's Bill, the

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2 hours ago

1. Chewing Gum. Perhaps the most famous Singaporean law is the ban on chewing gum. When it first came to light in the early 1990s, it was one of the hot topics for journalists writing about the state of the city and remains one of the first things visitors learn about Singapore when they arrive, usually when trying to buy a packet of chewing gum at the airport.
2. Annoying Someone With a Musical Instrument. It is a common misconception that one of Singapore’s stranger laws prohibits people from singing while walking down the street – but the statute actually bans the singing of obscene songs, arguably an excessive length to go to in order to prevent people from hearing anything offensive.
3. Connecting to Someone Else’s Wi-Fi Network. Bloggers and Digital Nomads beware, according to Singapore’s Computer Misuse and Cybersecurity Act, it is illegal to connect to someone else’s wi-fi network with a penalty of up to three years in jail or a fine of $10,000.
4. Walking in the Nude at Home. Forget about public indecency, in Singapore you need to be mindful of private indecency! If you are seen walking around your house in the nude by another person, you are considered a public nuisance and can face jail time of up to three months and a fine of $2,000.
5. Forgetting to Flush a Public Toilet or Urinating in an Elevator. A big part of Singapore’s cleanliness comes from its strict rules enforcing this standard.

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8 hours ago English law (both common law and equity as it stood in 1826 as well as pre-1826 English legislation) was introduced to Singapore via the Second Charter of Justice. 1.2.10 1833: With the re-organisation of the East India Company’s possessions by the British

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6 hours ago Watching Money Heist might give the adrenaline rush of being a criminal, but most of us aren’t keen on winding up behind bars. After all, we’re law-abiding, good citizens who file our taxes and follow the rules. We won’t break any laws…or so we think. We’re not bank robbers or serial killers, but here are eight Singapore laws you might not know that may still land you …

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3 hours ago

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1 hours ago C$ Redeemable The development of Singapore law has tracked the development of Singapore’s own nation-building efforts. Singapore’s laws reflect a diversity of legal and cultural heritages and there has been a conscious effort, particularly after the 1990s, to develop its own laws and legal institutions. These efforts have now paved the way for Singapore law to be …

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3 hours ago Singapore's common law system is characterised by the doctrine of judicial precedent (stare decisis).Court decisions from England and other Commonwealth countries are not binding in the Singapore legal system, although Singapore is heavily influenced by English common law in several key areas, such as Contract, Tort and Restitution.

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6 hours ago The legal system of Singapore is based on the English common law system. Major areas of law – particularly administrative law, contract law, equity and trust law, property law and tort law – are largely judge-made, though certain aspects have now been modified to some extent by statutes.However, other areas of law, such as criminal law, company law and family law, are …

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8 hours ago The Sale of Goods Act, [39] an English Act made applicable to Singapore by the Application of English Law Act, sets out legal rules relating to the sale and purchase of goods. The Women's Charter [40] sets out the law relating to marriage, divorce and separation, family violence, and the protection of women and girls. Subsidiary legislation

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2 hours ago In 1998, the Law Awareness Committee of the Law Society of Singapore produced the first of the “Know The Law” booklets. Written in plain language, it is meant to be a user-friendly booklet for members of the public on various topics of Singapore law relevant to everyday life.

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4 hours ago There are three general sources of Singapore law: legislation, judicial precedents (), and custom.. Legislation is divided into statutes and subsidiary legislation. Statutes are written laws enacted by the Singapore Parliament, as well as by other bodies that had power to pass laws for Singapore in the past.Statutes enacted by these other bodies may still be in force if they …

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6 hours ago

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9 hours ago Business law is that area of law which requires extensive research and study in order to be able to remember the various statues and anomalies in previous court proceedings. This is why through a business law case study students are able to perform a reflective study which facilitates growth in retention and analytical abilities.

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6 hours ago in ASEAN. Rule of Law & Human Rights. Singapore has a common law system. Laws originate in and must be passed by the parliament, before assent by the President. A Presidential Council for Minority Rights examines all draft legislation to ensure it is will not unreasonably disadvantage Singaporean ethnic or religious minorities.

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7 hours ago There are lots of food centres eat there or within closed doors. Oh and Durian a special fruit is also banned on public transport – don’t do it! Punishment: S$5,000 fine . Despite all the laws that exist in Singapore, it is actually one of my favourite Asian countries to visit and live.

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4 hours ago Generally, labeling laws require that: 1) the composition of the products is disclosed in English, 2) labels/packaging materials not contain any references to diseases/conditions as specified in the schedule to the Medicines (Advertisement and Sale) Act; and 3) the advertising/sale promotion of the product in the public media be approved by the

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1 hours ago Answer: Singapore is known for its low crime rate and impeccable cleanliness. It is also sometimes called the fine city, which has a double meaning. The label refers to the finestate that Singapore is in, but it also refers to the many fines that the country hands out. Here is …

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4 hours ago Singapore, the most expensive city in the world to live in, and one of only three city-states left on earth, is a magnificent place to visit.From the majestic Merlion Statue and honorable Kranji War Memorial, to the orchid-enchanting Singapore Botanic Gardens and rainforest-themed Singapore Zoo, there’s something on this island city for everyone. . The …

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Frequently Asked Questions

How many english commercial statues are there in singapore?

The Application of English Law Act gives a list of the 13 English commercial statues that are part of the Singapore stature book, ending any uncertainty as to which ones were included. Imperial Acts were statutes passed by the United Kingdom Parliament and made applicable to colonies like the Straits Settlements.

What kind of legal system does singapore have?

The legal system of Singapore is based on the English common law system. Major areas of law – particularly administrative law, contract law, equity and trust law, property law and tort law – are largely judge-made, though certain aspects have now been modified to some extent by statutes.

What is a statute in singapore?

Statutes are laws enacted by the Singapore Parliament seeking to prevent something or to carry out a responsibility. For instance, the misuse of Drug Act seeks to prevent the abuse of drugs by Singapore citizens and all other nationalities in Singapore.

What are some of the most famous laws in singapore?

Perhaps the most famous Singaporean law is the ban on chewing gum. When it first came to light in the early 1990s, it was one of the hot topics for journalists writing about the state of the city and remains one of the first things visitors learn about Singapore when they arrive, usually when trying to buy a packet of chewing gum at the airport.

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